4 days tour from Agadir to Merzouga

4 days tour from Agadir to Merzouga

From €250/each
4 days +1 Travelers +7h/day

Tour overview:

On our 4 days tour from Agadir to Merzouga, you will visit a lot of places in Morocco, Morocco is so much more than just a beach destination! So why not combine your Agadir beach resort vacation with an adventure desert trip to the Erg Chebbi dunes? It’s achievable with this fascinating four-day desert excursion from Merzouga to the Sahara desert. Visit Taroudant, dubbed “Little Marrakech,” Talouine, a saffron-growing region with a government-run saffron museum, and Taznakht, which is full of co-operatives selling Berber rugs, for a better understanding of Berber life in the south. The Kasbah of Ait Ben Haddou is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. In the Skoura oasis and Kasbah Amredhil, you may get a glimpse of rustic Berber life. The Draa Valley, with its palm palms and historic kasbahs, depicts life in the oases and demonstrates ancient construction styles. In the Valley of a Thousand Kasbahs, the Damascene rose distillery offers pleasantly perfumed cosmetic products as wonderful mementos. The Dades Valley and Toudgha gorges provide spectacular geological wonders. A thrilling camel ride to the summit of Erg Chebbi Dunes follows a welcome glass of mint tea at the camp. You can witness the most beautiful sunset from here. Traditional Moroccan cuisine is served for dinner, which is followed by music around a campfire. The evening is perfectly rounded off by your exotic tent in a luxurious desert camp.

For a unique desert experience, take this 4 days tour from Agadir to Merzouga.
Photographing Taroudant’s preserved ancient walls and visiting Taznakht, which is known for its Berber rugs
Visiting the saffron museum in Talouine, which is located in the heart of the saffron-growing region.
Exploring the World Heritage Sites of UNESCO Ait Ben Haddou’s Kasbah
Visiting Kasbah Amredhil in Skoura, which is surrounded by a large number of palm palms.
In the Rose Valley, you may get Damascene rose items (if desired)
In Erg Chebbi Dunes, enjoying a sunset camel ride and shooting photos while wearing blue turbans.
Around a fire camp, enjoy an evening of Berber music and drumming.
Have a relaxing night in a luxurious desert camp.

Tour highlights

Tour itinerary

Day 1: Agadir – Ouarzazate

Departure our 4 days tour from Agadir to Merzouga by 4X4 from Agadir to Ouarzazate in the morning, going through Taroudant, sometimes known as “Little Marrakech,” Taliouine, and Taznakht. The route continues from here to the Kasbah Ait Ben Haddou, Morocco’s most famous Kasbah and one of the country’s nine UNESCO World Heritage sites. After lunch in the hamlet, go to the Kasbah and climb to the top for a panoramic view. The little village of Ouarzazate, where you will spend the night in a riad, is only a few kilometers away.

Day 2: Ouarzazate – Merzouga

The morning journey takes us from Ouarzazate to the Toudgha gorges through Skoura, where we will travel off-road to explore the Kasbahs, some of which are unfortunately in a state of ruin but are idyllically situated amongst a great number of palm trees in this lovely oasis. Amredhil, the most well-known of these Kasbahs, is definitely worth a photo stop and a quick visit. The major route runs through the Valley of Roses, where roses are distilled into oils, lotions, and creams that are sold all over the country. The Dades Valley, with its verdant gardens along the river and spectacular rock formations, is the next site to explore from there. In the Toudgha gorges, we halt for lunch. Our journey continues in the afternoon to the Merzouga dunes for a two-hour camel ride to the Erg Chebbi dunes (250m). The sunset is beautiful from the top of the dunes. You dine and sleep in a luxury tent with a private toilet, king-sized beds, lovely Moroccan furnishings, and lamps artfully set to maximize your enjoyment of the dunes’ silence and beauty.

Day 3: Merzouga – Agdz

If you get up early enough, you may see the sunrise, when the color of the dunes and the dance of shadows create a breathtaking scene. Following breakfast, the journey continues to the Dra’a Valley, Morocco’s longest valley. We stop for lunch in the villages of Rissani, Alnif, Tazzarine, and N’Qob along the way. The trek leads us to Tansikht in the afternoon, across the Dra’a River, which is sometimes a raging torrent and other times barely a trickle. We take a left here and head north, following the historic caravan route through the valley with its massive palm trees and ancient communities. We arrive at Agdz for dinner and a night’s stay towards the end of the afternoon.

Day 4: Agdz – Agadir

We drive northwest from Agdz to Taznakht, which is known for its Berber glims and carpets, after breakfast. We pass through gorgeous landscapes and the Bouazzer mines on our journey. This is a more remote and off-the-beaten-path section of the country. We next head west to Agadir, passing via the Tizi-n-Ikhsane and Tizi-n-Tighatine passes. We stop for lunch in Taliouine, the heart of Morocco’s saffron-growing region, where there is an outstanding small museum dedicated to the art of saffron cultivation. In the afternoon, the road takes us back to Taroudant, where we follow the often dry Souss River and countless argan trees on all the steep slopes back to Agadir, which we arrive by late afternoon. Around 18:00, your 4 days tour from Agadir to Merzouga comes to a close.

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Testimonials:

My girlfriend and I took a trip to Morocco with Trips Around Morocco, and everything went perfectly. We did a 4 days tour from Agadir to Merzouga, and Mohamed was our driver, and he made it even better than we expected. He is a true gentleman, and he gives us plenty of time to stop and explore the sights. Mohamed lives as a nomad, and he took us to lunch with his family, and everything was delicious. We will do it again with you guys!!

Akchay k

April 2020

We did a 4 days tour with Trips Around Morocco from Agadir to Merzouga, and it was the best experience that we could have had; my friends and I thoroughly enjoyed the tour with Mustapha as our guide, who thoroughly explained the Berber and Arabic cultures to us, making us feel as if we had visited Morocco; highly recommended. Thank you, Morocco Tours.

Mariana K

March 2020

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Highlights overview

Agadir

Agadir, Morocco’s regional capital, is located in the Atlas Mountains to the south. “Agadir n Irir” is a shortened version of the Berber term “Agadir n Iris,” which means “fortified granary.” It is a renowned tourist site due to its modern construction and spacious grounds. The beaches are tranquil and suitable for water sports. You can relax and enjoy wonderful Moroccan hospitality at a number of resorts.
This name’s actual origin is uncertain. Geschiedenis Agadir However, there may be a connection to a fort erected north of town by a Portuguese trader in 1505. It was eventually purchased by King Manuel I of Portugal, who transformed it into a garrison city. Agadir’s harbor was an important seaport serving Sudan and Guinea at the time.
In 1541, the Irish Saad captured it. During Agadir’s golden period, it was ruled by the Berber Kingdom of Souss in the 17th century and subsequently conquered by Moulay Ismail. Sisi Abdellah Mohammed closed the port and constructed a new Essouira, which never recovered its former glory.
Following the Agadir Crisis between France and Germany in 1911, France established a protectorate over Morocco. The 15 seconds on February 29, 1960, at midnight, when an earthquake devastated the entire city, killing hundreds, were the city’s darkest moments. The old Kasbah was completely destroyed. Morocco’s King Mohammed V, on the other hand, saw the calamity as an opportunity to rebuild the city. Agadir was reconstructed 3 kilometers south of where it had stood.

Ourzazate

Ouarzazate is a well-connected Moroccan city with a large number of well-designed hotels for tourists. Here’s a look at the city’s history and must-see sights if you’re planning a visit… With a population of roughly 105,200 inhabitants, Ouarzazate is unlike other Moroccan cities of its size. The Avenue Muhammed V, which begins before the city and runs alongside modern buildings, including the Tifoultoutte Kasbah, until it ends after Ouarzazate, is its focal point. Ouarzazate is well-established and geared for high-volume tourist, with a huge number of high-quality hotels but few eateries. Ouarzazate has a strange and lonely feel to town, except in the heart, where a traditional Moroccan market reigns supreme. Ouarzazate’s history Ouarzazate is a Moroccan city located in the south of the country. Its name is derived from a Berber phrase that means “no noise or confusion.” Frequently, tourists travelling through on their way to the Sahara Desert stop here. Before moving on to the wide deserts, the majority of them take a pit stop to refill their supplies. If you’re planning a trip like this, you should consider stopping in Ouarzazate for a day or two; it’s well worth it. Many travelers are awed by the magnificent and spiritual moments of life in this metropolis before continuing on to the virgin Sahara. The presence of huge film studios is another factor for its popularity. Ouarzazate is a city with a wide range of cultural and artistic traditions. It was once a simple crossing point for African traders on their way to Morocco’s northern cities and Europe. During the French occupation, it was built and expanded as a garrison town, administrative headquarters, and customs post.

Merzouga desert tour

If you ask me which African country has the most diverse landscapes and unparalleled cultural attractions, I will tell you that Morocco is the only one that meets all of those requirements. This North African country has a lot to offer tourists, including a wide choice of intriguing tourist attractions. Merzouga has become a well-known tourist destination in Morocco. This is a lovely and wonderful setting, full of mystery and allure. Because of the government’s well-developed infrastructure, getting to this location has never been easier. Many consider Merzouga to be the jewel of the Sahara, so make sure to include it in your travel plans so you can witness the charm for yourself.
Merzouga should be quite easy to get to these days. This small Moroccan community in the southeast is around 35 kilometers away from Rissani. It’s about 20 kilometers from Algeria’s border. It may take longer to reach there due to the 45-kilometer distance between Erfoud and this settlement. Sadly, in 2006, this wonderful village was devastated by devastating flash floods. Not only had the disaster claimed some lives, but it had also forced 1,200 people to flee their homes. This village has successfully recovered and reclaimed a major role in the tourism business of the country. Merzouga has grown in popularity as a tourist destination in Morocco, receiving tens of thousands of people each year.
Merzouga will provide enough of entertainment for all guests. Merzouga is recognized for having the country’s largest natural body of water, as well as for its Erg Chebbi. A wide range of ethnic groups have found a home in this village. Not only will you find Berbers in this village, but you will also find Arabs. Visitors are always welcomed by the people of this town. Every visitor to Merzouga will be treated with respect. As a result, many visitors may spend days in the area.
You can participate in a variety of activities to make your vacation to this village even more memorable. A single day trip to Merzouga would not be enough to see all of the city’s fascinating corners. Overnight camel excursions are one of the most unique ways to enjoy your time in Merzouga. The nearby Erg Chebbi sand dunes provide a fantastic recreational opportunity. Many guests enjoy renting a 4×4 vehicle and driving it across the sand dunes. Merzouga’s popular activities include camping and sand skiing. Because of its residents, this location attracts a large number of international tourists. The Berbers’ daily lives interest visitors from all over the world. Some travelers are having a great time while dining and enjoying mint tea with the locals. Instead of being a tourist, they give the idea of being a visitor. It’s rare to come across an encounter like this anywhere.